'The Bourne Supremacy' Review By Bawnian©-Dexeus

It's easy. She's standing right next to you.
  • OVERALL
    5.0
    SUPERB
  • Story
  • Acting
  • Directing
  • Visuals
The Bourne Supremacy is a 2004 action triller film.

Directed by: Paul Greengrass.

Starring: Matt Damon, Karl Urban, Brian Cox, Franka Potente, Julia Styles and Joan Allen.

Sorry for the delay. But it's not everyday you write three reviews in the best way possible only to have them get delete in a freak accident. Even harder to recreate it word for word.

Bourne will never be left alone. It is a reality we must all come to acknowledge. After Bourne discovers his identity, he lives for 2 years in a remote small populated section of world with Marie. Treadstone was de-commissioned along with its field director played by Chris Cooper. Ward Abbott, played by Brian Cox, is now running a new program called Operation Blackbriar. It has the same specifications as Treadstone, but eliminate both international and domestic threats. It introduces three new assets, and in this one, we get a Russian cleaner played by Karl Urban.

Within the agency, a mole is convinced that a secret branch within the CIA is operating against the country's rules for zero assassination. Kirill (Urban) eliminates the targets and plants Bourne's prints. He later tracks down Jason Bourne to eliminate him as well, so that the agency would chase a ghost for years to come. Bourne survives, but Marie gets a bullet to the head. Incentive enough for him to want to be found by the agency. Pamela Landy (Allen) investigates why Bourne would commit the crime in the first place. However, Jason Bourne is calling the shots now. It is one thing for an asset to get orders, but to operate on his own is like releasing an epidemic to the public.

Matt Damon abandons the soft nature he gained when he met Marie in the past. This time, he's out for revenge. At the same time, his character deals with past transgressions. He has not yet recovered is full memories, but does in the course of this sequel. Damon does an excellent job utilizing his eyes and body language to express the struggles of Bourne's past. Both his past off-the-books-mission is mirrored with him being framed. It's amazing what one man can do. He has the power to cause an entire agency to loose their hairs and sweat bullets. Kill him, and you are home free. Miss, and you should run for your life.

Like the video game, it's a conspiracy. Abbott becomes desperate he begins to crack down. He deserves to die. Bourne finds him, but doesn't kill him. Mercy provided by love. Kill the man who ruined your life, how better are you? Despite only partially clearing his name, the world is after him. In the end, Bourne seeks closure. He finds the daughter of the parents whom he killed in Berlin on his first mission. You can tell how difficult it is for Jason to have to confess his sins to the teenager. Of course, it's the least he can do, but an impact on the character. It proves that you can't take morality away from these killers.

The best moment is when Bourne fights the third operative from the previous movie who eliminated the head director of Treadstone. A veteran killer vs a rookie. It felt like a clash of the titans watching these two brawlers trying to snap each other's necks off. In a compact environment under heavy obstacles, they both square off in one of the best martial arts rivalry in cinema. If you can fight with your hands tied, you receive major respect. This man has become Bourne's second tough kill.

With a bigger budget and a new direction, the action increases tenfold. At no point do you ask yourself why there is a lack of explosions. Hardly, for the hand to hand combat scenes are as explosive as C-4. The editing department knows how to pace this series. When the action starts, you are set in it without missing a beat. The speed of the punches are inhuman, but what can I say? It's Jason Bourne.

Overall, a supreme sequel with a great cast and strong lead. The spy genre thriller continues hard.

Written by: Bawnian©-Dexeus.

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