'Monsieur Lazhar' Critic Reviews

100%
MovieWeb:   0 reviews
97%
Rotten Tomatoes:   113 reviews
  • Lisa Schwarzbaum Entertainment Weekly (Top Critic)
    75
    The movie's tonic lack of sentimentality binds the various griefs together into something moving.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • New York Times (Top Critic)
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Stephen Holden New York Times (Top Critic)
    80
    "Monsieur Lazhar" sustains an exquisite balance between grown-up and child's-eye views of education, teacher-student relations and peer-group interactions.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Xan Brooks Guardian [UK] (Top Critic)
    80
    Only the most obstreperous delinquent could fail to be charmed by Monsieur Lazhar, in which an Algerian refugee plays ramshackle Mary Poppins to the kids at a Montreal primary.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Ann Hornaday Washington Post (Top Critic)
    100
    "Monsieur Lazhar" is good. Really good.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Ty Burr Boston Globe (Top Critic)
    88
    What could be didactic is rendered life-size and indelible, even with the cards that Falardeau has carefully stacked.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Michelle Orange Village Voice (Top Critic)
    Nelisse, with her tough, Courtney Love puss, and Neron's portrayal of a boy's well-defended torment are extraordinary, as is the film's realization of the small, temporary world that surrounds them.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Joe Neumaier New York Daily News (Top Critic)
    80
    Falarde, in adapting a play, has a sweet, humanistic approach reminiscent of Bill Forsyth's '80s dramedies that lets "Lazhar's" protagonist and his class shine.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Joe Morgenstern Wall Street Journal (Top Critic)
    What makes the film enthralling is the wisdom and grace with which it addresses the twin subjects of grief and healing, and the quiet beauty of Mohamed Fellag's performance in the title role.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • David Edelstein New York Magazine (Top Critic)
    Ineffably sad-yet there's almost no loitering. The film is crisp, evenly paced, its colors bright, as sharp as the winter cold.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • David Denby New Yorker (Top Critic)
    Monsieur Lazhar is so discreet that it never quite comes to life.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Roger Ebert Chicago Sun-Times (Top Critic)
    88
    Its purpose is to present us with a situation, explore the people involved and show us a man who is dealing with his own deep hurts.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Michael Phillips Chicago Tribune (Top Critic)
    75
    It's all a bit neat. But whatever the film's limitations, it's certainly engaging to watch.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • J. R. Jones Chicago Reader (Top Critic)
    A standard liberal tale about an inspirational teacher gradually deepens into a quiet study of how grief works its way through a community.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Steven Rea Philadelphia Inquirer (Top Critic)
    88
    A sad, reflective study of the possibilities, and the impossibilities, inherent in the teacher-student relationship.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Colin Covert Minneapolis Star Tribune (Top Critic)
    88
    The film is rich in naturalistic, tossed-off details.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Tom Long Detroit News (Top Critic)
    75
    How do we get past tragedy? Together.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Bill Goodykoontz Arizona Republic (Top Critic)
    90
    A gentle film can still be searing in its effect on an audience, something that "Monsieur Lazhar" proves emphatically.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Rex Reed New York Observer (Top Critic)
    88
    Monsieur Lazhar builds hope in the face of tragedy and sheds new light on the question of what is truth and how we find it.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Boyd van Hoeij Variety (Top Critic)
    Quietly intelligent and respectable, much like its protag.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Kyle Smith New York Post (Top Critic)
    88
    Like a dedicated teacher, this is a film that stays with you.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Peter Howell Toronto Star (Top Critic)
    100
    It's a tapestry of fraught relationships, weaving issues of parental authority, social taboos and national boundaries. Empathy comes through understanding, but it's not easily achieved. It never is.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Eric Kohn indieWIRE (Top Critic)
    84
    [An] intelligent but generally cheery comedy.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Jennie Punter Globe and Mail (Top Critic)
    100
    An exquisite, humanistic and subtly topical work of cinema art that manages to keep the intimate, revelatory sensibility of a one-man play intact while fleshing out the characters and creating a very realistic and richly detailed school community.
    Full Review » 2 years ago
  • Dana Stevens Slate (Top Critic)
    Fellag, an Algerian comedian and humor writer, anchors the film as the ineffable Bachir, a man who's so private that even the third-act revelation of his back story doesn't fully explain his motivations to us (nor would we want it to).
    Full Review » 2 years ago