'Don't Be Afraid of the Dark' Review By Jay.A.Ottley

Troy Nixey creates and delivers a film as iconic as the original that has the viewer on the edge of their seat with enough thrills and underlying suspense and with Del Toro's dramatic writing they create something truly terrifying.
  • OVERALL
    3.0
    WORTHY
  • Story
  • Acting
  • Directing
  • Visuals
Don't Be Afraid Of The Dark is the second film of the year to helm the title 'Guillermo Del Toro Presents' with the other film being Julia Eyes. The difference between the two is one is presented within the English language, the other in Spanish and headlined by Del Toro and by the same team that brought you The Orphanage. But it will come as no surprise which film will be better out of the two in our Double Whammy Del Toro Presents reviews... So should you Be Afraid Of The Dark or terrified by Julia's Eyes?

Don't Be Afraid Of The Dark, takes all the elements of the early Del Toro flicks and it comes as no shocker since his a co-writer. The film grabs these elements and grounds them mythology and folklore within the concept of the little boogeyman in the dark that indulge in the succulent taste of little kids and teeth. Within an ancient house lies a dark secret, which becomes owned by interior decorator couple, Kim (Katie Holmes) and Alex (Guy Pearce) and Alex's daughter, Sally (Bailee Madison), who finds a concealed basement, in their house with voices beckoning for help and to be free and for Sally to come play with them and that they are friends. Unbeknownst to her they have a brutal cunning goal to have and snatch our young triumphal star of the film.

Our cast of the film, perform strong jobs in their roles even Katie Holmes doe s a grand job with her performance within her screen time. She makes her character as real as can be as a caring stepmother of a troubled child. She is the character that always recorrects Alex's character of his actions from right and wrong and how he should be acting as a father and that chemistry works.

Guy Pearce's character, Alex is the cliché male model bunged with his kid that doesn't know how to be a proper father or even where to begin. Because his mind is set on one goal. The goal of success and money and a better future. While I expected so much more from Pearce's performance none the less he puts on a grand performance.

Bailee Madison shines like a star and shines up the film as a young child star in her first film headlining in her first proper lead role up against some heavy-hitters like Guy Pearce and Katie Holmes. While Bailee is no Chloe Grace Moretz, nor is she Dicaprio at that same tender age, but she has every upstanding potential to be in their leagues at such a young age. She is the adorable youngling, a typical cliché little doll of a girl, sp*ced up with psychological problems and mentally damaged by the current state of affairs of her parents. She's also overdosed on the cuteness value, she's the type of character that you don't want to be snagged away for the little monsters to devour her teeth with pulsating crunches and munches with subtle, soft and gentle whispers preying her in for the kill. You entirely care for her character.

Don't Be Afraid Of The Dark is a visual achievement, in terms of its stunning location mirage with an eerie atmosphere of creepiness. The cinematography is beautiful with a dash of creepiness, with some iconic sequences that daze the viewer in its beauty. From a shot of the film, where were first enter the house accompanied by a smooth and delicate one-shot, revealing the house in all its glory, set in the limitation of Sally's point of view before drifting away. To a memorable shot of showing the house in the reflection of the water to smooth to the shots and scenes involving Sally in the lake area mirage with au natural beauty with mesmerizing sequences with ITS eerie creepy score, that fits and adds a new element to any scene it accompanies.

Troy Nixey creates and delivers a film as iconic as the original that has the viewer on the edge of their seat with enough thrills and underlying suspense and with Del Toro's dramatic writing they create something truly terrifying.

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Comments (7)

  1. Jay.A.Ottley

    @m2

    Thanks dude, and why were you let down by it?

    2 years agoby @jayaottleyFlag

  2. Jay.A.Ottley

    @ROFLitschristian@Georgia-DiPirro

    Thanks ladies and gentlemen :)

    2 years agoby @jayaottleyFlag

  3. m2

    @jayaottley I really was let down by this and would give it a 2.0, but I see your point for giving it a 3.0. Great review.

    2 years agoby @m2Flag

  4. Georgia DiPirro

    Look at you go ... Another one --Good JOB @jayaottley

    2 years agoby @Georgia-DiPirroFlag

  5. ROFLitschristian

    Nice review, Jay.

    2 years agoby @ROFLitschristianFlag