Forums: Is the movie industry dying?

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  • 6 years ago
  • I mean, I know it's not suddenly going to just end, but trends like this one aren't promising. I'm starting to get really frustrated with high ticket prices. I know it keeps me out of the theater a lot!:mad: I'm not the only one, am I?
  • 6 years ago
  • No, the movie industry isn't dying, it's actually one of the few recession proof businesses. 2008 box office grosses almost matched the previous record year's, which is saying alot because of our present bad economy.

    The pending actor's strike and credit crunch will impact the industry in the second half of 2009 though. It's much harder for studios to obtain financing deals that weren't already established.

    As for high ticket prices, a 10 dollar ticket (or cheaper for matinee) is relatively cheaper than other entertainment, such as $60 video games. Just be more judicious with inflated concessions (pop corn, cokes, etc.).
  • 6 years ago
  • Yes it is dieing

    ...........

    and being reborn

    we are going through the bumps currently

    this is a human evolution thing, not a business thing

    as far as money and the boxoffices go, many people are getting lazier, and unimaginative so in turn people will keep flooding the theatres

    Judging films successfulness based on dollars made from movies comparing the past and present is tough for me to gage, since the opportunity to see films has become limitless compared to sparce showings of films in the past and the prices keep going up so I guess there are multiple factors to consider
  • 6 years ago
  • I wouldn't say its dying or being reborn its just constantly changing with the exception of a few things. As long as Hollywood is still making a quality product people will pay to watch movies and tv.
  • 6 years ago
  • The movie industry certainly isn't dying but it is evolving. More people watch movies at home now than in the past simply because they have more opportunities to do so. Cable, satellite, DVD/BluRay, internet. Many sequels are made that simply never make it to the theater. There will always be theaters and there will always be people wanting to go. You may not be able to go as often as you'd like with ticket prices going so high but for the true movie fan the theater will always be the place to see a movie.
    No good deed goes unpunished.
  • 6 years ago
  • Over here in the UK, Cinema prices vary as to where you live.. Example areas with low incomes..like Stoke, the prices are roughly &#1636 Adults &#1634 children..now in London its about &#16313 Adults, but wages are alot higher down there..

    When I first saw the title of this thread, I thought the reason was for lack of originality in films, hence the amount of remakes..

    But around where I live, although prices are reasonable, folks do seem to opt for staying at home to watch their movies particuarly with the huge TVs on offer now, complete with surround sound.

    I love the Cinema, and try and go as often as I can, but many times I go I always end up bollockin someone for talking out loud, of generaly making a nuisance while everyone is trying to watch the movie.
    That pisses me off, because why pay good money, then not watch the movie?
  • 6 years ago
  • Although we are seeing the crunch of the recession hit even this industry. Studios are dropping films because they don't want to put huge amounts of money into films that they aren't guarunteed a return from. Consider the studio (can't remember who it was) dropping the Jackson/Spielberg Tintin trilogy when they found out how much it would cost. Spielberg had to shop to other studios. Same goes with the Narnia franchise when Disney dropped out of releasing the third film last week. Walden had to go elsewhere so now FOX will be releasing the next Narnia film, and that's pretty huge because not only is Disney one of the biggest and most well-established companies in film, but the first two Narnia films made a ton of money.
  • 6 years ago
  • not only is Disney one of the biggest and most well-established companies in film, but the first two Narnia films made a ton of money.
    But Disney is also the most greedy and selfish studio out there in my opinion and the sequel dint do has much has they wanted it to make
  • 6 years ago
  • "The Lion..." US Gross - $291,709,845 (budget $180m) = $111,709,845 profit
    "Caspian" US Gross - $141,614,023 (budget $200m) = $ 58,385,977 loss

    Yeah, wow. I never realized they actually lost money on it (according to IMDB). I wonder why that is? You'd think everyone who was interested in the first one would have been interested in the second one. I thought they were pretty much equal in terms of quality. I guess the first book is more of a well-known story.
  • 6 years ago
  • the movie industry can never die cause there will always be people with ideas
    and outstanding imagination

    i want to be a filmaker to be remembered
  • 6 years ago
  • I don't go to see movies as much as I used to. Mostly due to the tickets being over $10 bucks. The movie industry still pays tons of money for screenplays and scripts even if they don't pump out as many movies as they used to. They have it figured out so well that any film they make will generate profit.

    But is the industry dying? No, like the music industry, if the movie industry does not change they will suffer, but they will never die. I think they are crazy for fighting online users over copyright infringement. It's not like the people aren't their livelihood or anything and a kid posting clips of his favorite movie is just good free advertising.
  • 5 years ago
  • Today I learned that Samuel Jackson might not play Nick Fury in the upcoming Marvel movies and that Terrence Howard won't be in Iron Man 2 because Marvel can't afford to pay them. The recession is forcing them to cut the salary budget on their movies.
  • 5 years ago
  • Jackson already inked a nine-movie deal with Marvel and I'm pretty sure that's solid.
    As for Terrence Howard, I believe they refused to pay him the amount he was asking for because it was exorbitant, not because they couldn't afford it.
  • 5 years ago
  • Whatever is happening I think that it will be good for the movie industry because it will force them to create quality movies instead of the crap that they have been producing for a while now. I think that the art should be brought back into movie making and it should not be focused on money making.
  • 5 years ago
  • There is talent out there. But the money-minded studios, independent production companies, and just about any other film financiers are not interested in art whatsoever.

    In the good old days (AKA any year prior to 2000), production companies would find genuine talent and then milk it for all it was worth. Today, they aren't patient enough to find real talent. So they settle for non-talents and milk them for all they're worth.

    The movie industry will never die because people will always be willing to hand over money to see... anything. Just look at the high figures many of today's junk movies are raking in. For shame. For shame.
  • 5 years ago
  • Industry has a huge competition but it's not dieing ... and it will never die ....while technology improves,making of the movies also increased.
  • 5 years ago
  • "The Lion..." US Gross - $291,709,845 (budget $180m) = $111,709,845 profit
    "Caspian" US Gross - $141,614,023 (budget $200m) = $ 58,385,977 loss

    No. Actually, Caspian grossed $141,621,490 in the US and $278,029,923 overseas with a budget of $225mil... so, it still earned $194,651,413.

    Sucks because Caspian was actually good. Maybe it's because of the bad timing of release after the first film and/or poor marketing promotion? I don't know. :biggrin:

    As for the movie industry, NO. It's not dying.
  • 5 years ago
  • :biggrin:How could you say that?We have to admmit that the worldwide economy crisis affects the movie industry more or less.But it is still developing.:biggrin:
  • 5 years ago
  • As for high ticket prices, a 10 dollar ticket (or cheaper for matinee) is relatively cheaper than other entertainment, such as $60 video games. Just be more judicious with inflated concessions (pop corn, cokes, etc.).
  • 5 years ago
  • In the good old days (AKA any year prior to 2000), production companies would find genuine talent and then milk it for all it was worth. Today, they aren't patient enough to find real talent. So they settle for non-talents and milk them for all they're worth.
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